David Konarske


Recent articles


ONLINE EXCLUSIVE: Students share feelings, concerns on Reed case, off-campus safety

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At least one person walked by the body of Demarius Reed after he was fatally shot, and as many as six people heard gunfire the night of the murder in his apartment complex, according to interim Ypsilanti Police Chief Tony DeGiusti.

24-hour news over-covers Boston bombing

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On April 15, a horrifying event took place when a pair of terrorists set off two bombs at the Boston Marathon. The 24-hour news outlets covered it all day, reporting on updated death tolls and the like, which was understandable.

Be ‘pro-law’ on abortion

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Last week, there was a pro-life exhibit on Eastern Michigan University’s campus. I could write an article about the intolerance that causes some people to call pro-life arguments anti-science. I could write about the idea that calling pro-life advocates “anti-woman” would be like calling “pro-choice” advocates “pro-death.” I could even write about the fact that abortions are disproportionally performed on people in poverty, but I will not.

Economy falling short, government adds to problem

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According to an April 5 Reuters article, the Department of Labor reported the nation created 88,000 jobs in March, far short of the market’s prediction of 200,000 jobs. Another Reuters article from the same day said the economy has barely been able to keep up in creating jobs. The article said the unemployment rate would have gone up if so many people hadn’t dropped out of the labor force. This month may be a blessing in disguise, because it adds an exclamation point to the economic complaints present in the media for a while now.

Obama sets ‘dangerous precedent’ in law decisions

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The Hill reported in a March 27 article that a number of conservative Supreme Court justices are questioning the Obama administration’s decision in 2011 to no longer defend the Defense of Marriage Act. DOMA is a law that does not allow same sex couples to receive federal benefits contingent on marriage, such as survivor’s benefits and certain tax deductions. The Department of Justice, at the direction of President Barack Obama, has decided it will not defend the law on the grounds that it is unconstitutional.

Parking problem? Not really

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Being a commuter myself, I am sympathetic to issues involving parking. And having had a car that could not go in reverse, I have had more parking problems than most people. I also agree that more attention seems to be paid to campus residents than commuter students.

Partisan distrust cycle needs time to overcome

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President Barack Obama ended what was dubbed the “charm offensive” by the popular media last week, where he met with Democrats and Republicans in both chambers of Congress to attempt to build trust between the parties. People hoped this would lead to a new period of bipartisan cooperation, but it is more complicated than it seems.

Say no to minimum pay raise

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I do not know anyone who is for poverty in the U.S. In fact, I am confident most Americans are against poverty in general. As odd as it may sound, poverty is one of the reasons Americans should be against raising the minimum wage from $7.25 to $9 an hour as proposed by President Barack Obama in his recent State of the Union speech. As nice as eliminating poverty by giving low-income workers more money sounds, it has many unintended consequences attached to it.

Polls show plenty of Republicans

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Since President Barack Obama’s victory over Mitt Romney in last year’s election, I have had to listen to people trying to force the Republican Party to become “moderate.” Much like after the 2008 election, the press and many people from both parties have come out of the woodwork to claim the party needs to make major changes in order to be competitive. I have even heard the modern Republican Party, as a whole, described as “radical.”

Obama’s Middle East policies inconsistent

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President Barack Obama has defended his actions in the Middle East and North Africa for a while now. He has taken credit for ending the war in Iraq, trying to end the war in Afghanistan and toppling Middle-Eastern dictators, all while keeping America’s interests in mind.

Obama has finally pushed limits too far

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Our history is full of activist presidents who pushed the limits of executive power. While pushing is sometimes necessary to make things happen, it’s possible to push too far, as former President Franklin Roosevelt found when he introduced a bill to add more justices to the Supreme Court to get more favorable rulings regarding his New Deal legislation.

Obama campaign reaches new level

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President Barack Obama’s campaign organization has officially turned into a nonprofit group. The group, called Organizing for Action, will be classified as a group that cannot influence an election and will be mainly tasked with pushing the president’s agenda for the next four years.

Diversity of Obama’s Cabinet is a nonissue

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Over the last week, I have heard complaints from the news media about a lack of diversity in President Barack Obama’s Cabinet and inner circle. However, this is just something for the media to complain about in order to fill space in newspapers and newscasts, because it is not a big deal in a practical sense.

US citizens cannot be trusted with guns

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After the tragedy at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., many public figures have come out on the side of expanding gun control. Allowing law-abiding citizens to take affirmative actions in their own defense will do nothing more than endanger the citizens around them, because even the most educated individuals are too irresponsible to make good decisions.

Education plan worthy

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In a Nov. 18 article, the Detroit Free Press announced that Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder is proposing a massive overhaul of the state’s education system, called the Michigan Public Education Finance Act. Opposition has come from many directions, including public school officials and the American Federation of Teachers.

Affirmative Action serves as a step backwards for equality

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The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit struck down Michigan’s ban on Affirmative Action Nov. 15. The ban, known as the Michigan Civil Rights Initiative, was added to our State Constitution in 2006 after being approved by 58 percent of the electorate.

The battle for the 51st state: Against Puerto Rican Statehood

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This election year saw lots of partisan bickering, lots of yard signs and lots of stump speeches. For the most part, it wasn’t much different from past elections. However, there was a unique development that seems to have gone unnoticed by many Americans: The people of Puerto Rico have voted that they want to add their star to the U.S. flag and become the nation’s 51st state.

Windows 8: A step forward

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Microsoft’s new Windows 8 operating system has been out for almost three weeks and it is a good next step in the evolution of the OS. I downloaded my upgrade the day after it came out and only
paid $15 for it since I bought my laptop in June.

Debates reveal true nature of politics

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Last week, the final debate of the presidential election ended. This time, I decided to watch the debate in Eastern Michigan University’s Student Center after the Mock Presidential Debate ended.

Surprising Detroit Tigers make strong push to get spot in Series

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Almost a month ago, I wrote an article about my disappointment with the Detroit Tigers’ regular-season play. As a result, I have heard remarks from a number of people (including my editor) since they clinched their spot in the World Series.


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